2016 Holiday Assembly Remarks

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The following is taken from Head of School Tom Gibian’s remarks at the All-School Holiday Assembly on Dec. 13, 2016.

It is with great joy that I wish all students, faculty, staff, and the parents who have snuck into this assembly (you know who you are) a most wonderful winter holiday. It is my hope . . . → Read More: 2016 Holiday Assembly Remarks

A Post-Election Message from Tom Gibian

Edward Hicks, "The Peaceable Kingdom"

Election day meant different things to different people. In our school community, we recognize and hold up the importance of respect for those holding views different from our own, and the immeasurable value of teaching and learning in a space where we, unambiguously, support the need for all to feel safe in their self-expression. We . . . → Read More: A Post-Election Message from Tom Gibian

Opening Remarks From the Head of School Forum

The following is taken from the opening remarks by Tom Gibian at the Head of School Open Forum with Parents, held on Wed, Oct. 5.

Thank you for coming. It is a joy to be with you all. I will begin with some ground rules.

Tonight is a school night so we will wrap . . . → Read More: Opening Remarks From the Head of School Forum

The One Where We Welcome Our Students

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To all of our returning students; welcome back. To all of our students who started school at Sandy Spring Friends School for the first time the week before last; welcome, we are glad you are here.

Every morning when I wake up, one of the first things I think about is how we can make . . . → Read More: The One Where We Welcome Our Students

The One About How to Respond to the Question “Are You A Quaker?”

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As Head of Sandy Spring Friends School, I am, from time-to-time, in conversations where someone might use the expression “non-Quaker” to describe those of us who are not members of the Religious Society of Friends. Recently, I have decided to banish the “N-Q” phrase from my vocabulary. Instead I simply say: “she is not a . . . → Read More: The One About How to Respond to the Question “Are You A Quaker?”

The One About Speaking Out

To name what a person says or does an injustice carries with it a certain responsibility. Once the accusation is made, it is hard to walk it back. If there is room for a misunderstanding, our first obligation is to seek clarification. History demonstrates and common sense confirms that to remain silent when political leadership . . . → Read More: The One About Speaking Out

The One About Family and the Holidays

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We are a Friends School and that means we have our SPICES: Simplicity, Peace, Integrity, Community, Equality and Stewardship.

These are important values. I said that they were our SPICES, but they are universal. They are shared. They are ancient and they are contemporary. They are so basic that we teach them to our four . . . → Read More: The One About Family and the Holidays

The One About Family and Traditions

Tom Gibian as Max the Dog in the annual SSFS Holiday faculty skit, "How the Grinch Stole the Holidays."

Tom Gibian as Max the Dog in the annual SSFS Holiday faculty skit, “How the Grinch Stole the Holidays.”

Taken from Tom Gibian’s remarks at the Sandy Spring Friends School Holiday All-School Assembly

Every so often someone makes a video about Sandy Spring Friends School and we put it up on our website or . . . → Read More: The One About Family and Traditions

The One About Thanking Teachers

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Taken from Tom Gibian’s remarks at the Sandy Spring Friends School End of Year All-School Assembly

This year has gone amazingly fast. This is the fifth time I’ve been lucky enough to speak at the end-of-year assembly. Our fifth-graders, the masters of the lower school universe, were in first grade, and our seniors–our amazing seniors . . . → Read More: The One About Thanking Teachers

The One About Ferguson

I have been thinking about Michael Brown: his shooting; the investigation; the grand jury; the reaction of the Ferguson community to his death. We have learned much. We have learned that things are more complicated than they first appear, that there are two sides to every tragedy, that we may never have all of the . . . → Read More: The One About Ferguson